Immigration Enforcement

New ICE program enhances identifying and removing criminal aliens in Fairfax County

Now criminal and immigration records of all detainees to be checked

FAIRFAX, Va. -Fairfax County Sheriff’s Office and other law enforcement agencies have been added to a growing list of jurisdictions throughout the country that are receiving access to a program called Secure Communities, administered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Fairfax County is the first location in the Washington Metropolitan Area and the first in Virginia to participate. Secure Communities will streamline the process for ICE to determine if an individual in local custody is a potentially removable criminal alien.

Beginning today, the immigration records in DHS’s biometric database, if any, of every individual booked in the Fairfax County Adult Detention Center and other sites in the county will be checked. Formerly as part of that booking process, arrestees’ fingerprints were taken and checked for criminal history information against the DOJ biometric system maintained by the FBI. With the implementation of Secure Communities, the fingerprints of arrested individuals will now be automatically checked against both the FBI’s criminal history records and the biometrics-based immigration records maintained by DHS.

If an individual’s fingerprints match those of a person in DHS’s biometric system, the new automated process will notify ICE and the participating agency submitting the fingerprints. ICE will evaluate each case to determine the individual’s immigration status and take appropriate enforcement action. Top priority will be given to offenders who pose a threat to the public safety, such as aliens with prior convictions for major drug offenses, murder, rape, robbery, and kidnapping.

“Secure Communities is a new effort to identify and ultimately remove dangerous criminal aliens from our communities,” said Executive Director for ICE Secure Communities David Venturella. “Our goal with this ICE program is to use technology to prevent criminal aliens from being released back into the community, with little or no additional burden on our local law enforcement partners.”

“This is a win-win situation both for the community and law enforcement,” said Fairfax County Sheriff Stan Barry. “We will be able to identify illegal immigrants who commit crimes in Fairfax County and get them in the process for deportation, and it does not require additional funds or manpower from us.”

Secure Communities enhances the ongoing joint efforts by ICE and the law enforcement agencies in Virginia. Eventually, in collaboration with DOJ and other DHS components, ICE plans to expand this capability to all state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the nation. Approximately 50 counties nationwide are current Secure Communities participants.

Secure Communities is the cornerstone of DHS’s comprehensive plan to distribute technology that links local law enforcement agencies to both FBI and DHS biometric systems. DHS’s US VISIT Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) holds biometrics-based immigration records, while the FBI’s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) contains biometric-based criminal records.

“US VISIT is proud to support the Secure Communities program, helping provide decision makers with comprehensive, reliable information when and where they need it,” said US VISIT Director Robert Mocny. “By enhancing the interoperability of DHS’s and the FBI’s biometric systems, we are able to give federal, state and local decision makers information that helps them better protect our communities and our nation.”

“Under this plan, ICE will be utilizing FBI system enhancements that allow improved information sharing at the state and local law enforcement level based on positive identification of incarcerated criminal aliens. Additionally, ICE and the FBI are working together to take advantage of the strong relationships already forged between the FBI and state and local law enforcement necessary to assist ICE in achieving their goals,” said FBI Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) former Assistant Director Tom Bush.

Secure Communities is a key facet of ICE’s enforcement priority to identify, locate and remove criminal aliens and builds on the growing success of the agency’s Criminal Alien Program. In fiscal year 2008, ICE identified more than 221,000 potentially removable aliens incarcerated nationwide. This fiscal year, the agency anticipates spending more than $1 billion on such efforts, which in addition to Secure Communities, also includes expansion of the agency’s Criminal Alien Program and Fugitive Operations Program.

More information about ICE’s Secure Communities program is available at www.ice.gov.

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March 11, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bradley County, Tennessee partners with ICE and joins Criminal Alien Program

Written by B. Gault, Public Information Office
Monday, 22 September 2008
The Bradley County Sheriff’s Office has joined the Federal Criminal Alien Program offered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

The Criminal Alien Removal Act of 2008 directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to carry out a program to:

  1. Identify incarcerated criminal aliens.
  2. Ensure that such aliens are not released into the community.
  3. Remove such aliens from the United States upon release.

Sheriff Tim Gobble and Chief Deputy Bill Dyer met recently with representatives of ICE to finalize details of Bradley County’s participation. The act focuses on identifying criminal aliens who are incarcerated in Bradley County thereby helping to ensure that they are not released back into our community after they serve their sentence.

This program allows the correction staff in the Bradley County jail’s booking office to check the immigration status of all new inmates. As a normal part of the booking process correction officers will ask all inmates a number of questions such as where they were born and if they are a United States citizen. If the officer suspects the person being booked is here illegally or that their immigration status is questionable, an inquiry will begin to obtain more information about the individual. Those with questionable legal status have their names faxed to ICE for computer records checks and status verification.

If ICE cannot verify legal status, the individual is assumed to be here illegally and ICE will issue a federal detainer and forward it to the BCSO. This allows the BCSO to hold these individuals after their court proceedings are over and / or sentence is served.

Once the judicial process has concluded, the person will be held for federal authorities who have 48 hours to pick them up and begin deportation proceedings. This program also prevents those identified as illegal aliens from being released on bond once the detainer is received.

Sheriff Gobble said, “This is a step in the right direction, but the Federal government must get the illegal alien problem under control by securing the U.S. borders and quickly deporting all who come here illegally. The first test of citizenship is the ability to follow the law. If someone comes to this country illegally they have failed the first test of citizenship and should be deported until they can demonstrate adherence and respect for this country’s rule of law.”

“I am a great supporter of legal immigration and I am proud that the Statute Of Liberty still welcomes the world’s ‘tired, poor and huddled masses yearning to breathe free’ and holds her welcoming lamp ‘beside the golden door.’”

“However, I am strongly opposed to illegal immigration. It is important for all immigrants desiring citizenship to come here legally, it is also imperative that the federal government reduce the immigration bureaucracy and streamline a legal immigration process that promotes lawful entry into this country instead of discouraging it.”

Chief Deputy Dyer pointed out over the last several years there has been a noticeable increase in criminal offenders being brought to the jail who are unable to provide the arresting officer and the booking officer with either a driver’s license, social security card or any authenticated immigration papers.

Sheriff Gobble has worked diligently for months seeking viable solutions for the increasing local illegal alien problem.

“Getting this illegal alien problem under control will promote public safety and National Security for all citizens.”

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September 23, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Harris County Texas Judicial candidate, Charles Bacarisse, works to improve Criminal Alien Program(CAP)

HOUSTON — Conservative leader Charles Bacarisse today saluted officials in Travis and Bexar counties for following his lead and partnering with the federal government to help identify and deport undocumented convicted felons rather than releasing them back onto Texas streets.

As a San Antonio Express-News story “U.S., local immigration teamwork is hailed” (go to https://ncvoiceblog.wordpress.com/2008/02…) details, the Criminal Alien Program (CAP) operated for many years as an informal arrangement between federal agents and local authorities across the country without a centralized tracking system.

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February 22, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Criminal Alien Program assists deportation of illegal immigrants

Hernán Rozemberg
Express-News

The rapid growth of a little-known program that teams federal agents with local authorities to identify and deport jailed immigrants is being embraced as a way to reduce crime and illegal immigration simultaneously. The expansion has been felt throughout South Central Texas, with 22 more Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents added to the area last year.


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February 12, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | 3 Comments